The other day I was posting on Twitter and I noticed an article that discussed how having a work wife makes us better employees. In the linked article it notes that having a best friend at work makes an employee seven times more likely to properly engage in tasks and projects. It sounded a big vague to me, but the positives of having someone you can have deeper conversations with at work are quite apparent, and honestly aren’t that hard to believe. It seems obvious that if you have a great friend at work you’re more likely to stay working at an organization and have a team mentality.

It got me to thinking about how much we really need each other to have any success in our lives. Growing up, my dad was, and still is in many ways, my role model and benchmark. I admire everything my dad has accomplished. I have seven brothers and sisters, so my parents had to have a lot of patience with us, and my dad was always such a great provider for such a large family. Not only did he teach me discipline, but he also started and still owns his own company almost thirty years ago, which practically everyone in the family has worked at for at least a short period of time. I not only learned how to be a man from my dad, but I also learned a ton about decision making in a business environment. While I don’t work for my dad anymore, he is one the biggest inspirations in my life to this day and likely a big reason for any success I have and will have in my career.

After I grew up a little bit, I eventually got married to my wife of almost 9 years now.  At the ripe old age of 22, my wife became the number one influence in my life.  My wife is probably one of the luckiest things that ever happened to me, because I didn’t know that she would turn out to be such a motivating factor for me to be a better man. I mean, as any man would hopefully say about his wife, I thought she was gorgeous and smart, but there’s no way I could have known that should would be so successful in her career and such a selfless mother of my 3 year old boy and 2 year old daughter. She has it all, and I know that I totally lucked out.  I hear a lot of people say not to compare yourself to others, but I totally disagree. Marry someone great and try like heck to keep up.

A horse never runs so fast as when he has other horses to catch up and outpace. – Ovid

 As I write this blog post, I find myself being mostly encouraged by those who are encouraged by my posts. My good friend growing up, my sister in law, my co-workers, and other friends and readers who tell me that my posts have motivated them to be a little bit better have motivated me to be a little bit better. It’s awesome, and it’s exactly what I intended when I started this blog, my website, and Facebook page.  The trick in this whole cycle of improvement is that it takes action from both parties.

I don’t want to beat a dead horse on this post (no pun intended from the Ovid quote above), so I’m going to wrap it up quickly here. If I can get you to do one thing today, it would be to start the cycle with a friend, co-worker, or significant other right now. Start with some simple words of encouragement.  Tell them the positives about them. Maybe you appreciate that a co-worker taught you something new. Do something to help them out or at the very least pay them a compliment. If you’re wife is an amazing person like mine, tell her tonight. Take your time and tell her why you’re saying it and be specific. Be a little better for her. She certainly deserves it. Say thanks to a boss for being a leader or role model. Be that leader for someone else. As Ovid said in the quote above, be the horse that drives the others to run faster and hopefully you’ll have someone else to catch up to to make you better.

I’d love to hear about relationships that have motivated you in the past and the ways that others have helped drive you to be better. If you feel like sharing feel free to comment below.

As always, thanks for reading, and remember to be a great friend today!

Robert Krickeberg

 

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